← 4.10.18 Association of controls and formsTable of contents4.10.19.6 Form submission →
      1. 4.10.19 Attributes common to form controls
        1. 4.10.19.1 Naming form controls
        2. 4.10.19.2 Enabling and disabling form controls
        3. 4.10.19.3 A form control's value
        4. 4.10.19.4 Autofocusing a form control
        5. 4.10.19.5 Limiting user input length

4.10.19 Attributes common to form controls

4.10.19.1 Naming form controls

The name content attribute gives the name of the form control, as used in form submission and in the form element's elements object. If the attribute is specified, its value must not be the empty string.

Any non-empty value for name is allowed, but the names "_charset_" and "isindex" are special:

isindex

This value, if used as the name of a Text control that is the first control in a form that is submitted using the application/x-www-form-urlencoded mechanism, causes the submission to only include the value of this control, with no name.

_charset_

This value, if used as the name of a Hidden control with no value attribute, is automatically given a value during submission consisting of the submission character encoding.

The name IDL attribute must reflect the name content attribute.

4.10.19.2 Enabling and disabling form controls

The disabled content attribute is a boolean attribute.

A form control is disabled if its disabled attribute is set, or if it is a descendant of a fieldset element whose disabled attribute is set and is not a descendant of that fieldset element's first legend element child, if any.

A form control that is disabled must prevent any click events that are queued on the user interaction task source from being dispatched on the element.

Constraint validation: If an element is disabled, it is barred from constraint validation.

The disabled IDL attribute must reflect the disabled content attribute.

4.10.19.3 A form control's value

Form controls have a value and a checkedness. (The latter is only used by input elements.) These are used to describe how the user interacts with the control.

To define the behaviour of constraint validation in the face of the input element's multiple attribute, input elements can also have separately defined values.

4.10.19.4 Autofocusing a form control

The autofocus content attribute allows the author to indicate that a control is to be focused as soon as the page is loaded or as soon as the dialog within which it finds itself is shown, allowing the user to just start typing without having to manually focus the main control.

The autofocus attribute is a boolean attribute.

An element's nearest ancestor autofocus scoping root element is the element itself if the element is a dialog element, or else is the element's nearest ancestor dialog element, if any, or else is the element's root element.

There must not be two elements with the same nearest ancestor autofocus scoping root element that both have the autofocus attribute specified.

When an element with the autofocus attribute specified is inserted into a document, user agents should run the following steps:

  1. Let target be the element's Document.

  2. If target has no browsing context, abort these steps.

  3. If target's browsing context has no top-level browsing context (e.g. it is a nested browsing context with no parent browsing context), abort these steps.

  4. If target's active sandboxing flag set has the sandboxed automatic features browsing context flag, abort these steps.

  5. If target's origin is not the same as the origin of the Document of the currently focused element in target's top-level browsing context, abort these steps.

  6. If target's origin is not the same as the origin of the active document of target's top-level browsing context, abort these steps.

  7. If the user agent has already reached the last step of this list of steps in response to an element being inserted into a Document whose top-level browsing context's active document is the same as target's top-level browsing context's active document, abort these steps.

  8. If the user has indicated (for example, by starting to type in a form control) that he does not wish focus to be changed, then optionally abort these steps.

  9. Queue a task that checks to see if the element is focusable, and if so, runs the focusing steps for that element. User agents may also change the scrolling position of the document, or perform some other action that brings the element to the user's attention. The task source for this task is the DOM manipulation task source.

Focusing the control does not imply that the user agent must focus the browser window if it has lost focus.

The autofocus IDL attribute must reflect the content attribute of the same name.

In the following snippet, the text control would be focused when the document was loaded.

<input maxlength="256" name="q" value="" autofocus>
<input type="submit" value="Search">
4.10.19.5 Limiting user input length

A form control maxlength attribute, controlled by a dirty value flag, declares a limit on the number of characters a user can input.

If an element has its form control maxlength attribute specified, the attribute's value must be a valid non-negative integer. If the attribute is specified and applying the rules for parsing non-negative integers to its value results in a number, then that number is the element's maximum allowed value length. If the attribute is omitted or parsing its value results in an error, then there is no maximum allowed value length.

Constraint validation: If an element has a maximum allowed value length, its dirty value flag is true, its value was last changed by a user edit (as opposed to a change made by a script), and the code-unit length of the element's value is greater than the element's maximum allowed value length, then the element is suffering from being too long.

User agents may prevent the user from causing the element's value to be set to a value whose code-unit length is greater than the element's maximum allowed value length.