The current HTML5 URL is given below:

http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/PR-html5-20140916/references.html#refsURL

[URL]

URLs can be used in numerous different manners, in many differing contexts. For the purpose of producing strict URLs one may wish to consider Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax (URL: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986), T. Berners-Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter. IETF; and Internationalized Resource Identifiers (IRIs) (URL: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3987), M. Duerst, M. Suignard. IETF.

URL (URL: http://www.w3.org/TR/url/), E. Arvidsson, M.[tm] Smith. W3C.

At the time of publication, the URL draft above is out of date. We expect that it will be updated by the time this document goes to Recommendation.

Here is our proposed change:

[URL]

Note: URLs can be used in numerous different manners, in many differing contexts. For the purpose of producing strict URLs one may wish to consider [RFC3986] [RFC3987]. The W3C URL specification defines the term URL, various algorithms for dealing with URLs, and an API for constructing, parsing, and resolving URLs. Developers of Web browsers are advised to keep abreast of the latest URL developments by tracking the progress of https://url.spec.whatwg.org/. We expect that the W3C URL draft will evolve along the Recommendation track as the community converges on a definition of URL processing.

Most of the URL-related terms used in the HTML specification (URL, absolute URL, relative URL, relative schemes, scheme component, scheme data, username, password, host, port, path, query, fragment, percent encode, get the base, and UTF-8 percent encode) can be straightforwardly mapped to the terminology of [RFC3986] and [RFC3987]. The URLUtils (formerly known as URL) collection of attributes (e.g. href and protocol) and its required definitions (input, query encoding, url, update steps, set the input) are considered common practice nowadays. Some of the URL-related terms are still being refined (e.g. URL parser, parse errors, URL serializer, default encode set, and percent decode).

As a word of caution, there are notable differences in the manner in which Web browsers and other software stacks outside the HTML context handle URLs. While no changes would be accepted to URL processing that would break existing Web content, some important parts of URL processing should therefore be considered as implementation-defined (e.g. parsing file: URLs or operating on URLs that would be syntax errors under the [RFC3986] [RFC3987] syntax).

URL (URL: http://www.w3.org/TR/url/), E. Arvidsson, M.[tm] Smith. W3C.

[RFC3986]

Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax (URL: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986), T. Berners-Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter. IETF.

[RFC3987]

Internationalized Resource Identifiers (IRIs) (URL: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3987), M. Dürst, M. Suignard. IETF.